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01-Jan-2020


CITY YEAR: WHOLE SCHOOL WHOLE CHILD

Student and mentor working at a dry erase board, with City Year and BIC Corporate Foundation logos

ABOUT THE ORGANIZATION

 

NGO Name: City Year

Pillar: Fight Against School Dropout 

Location: United States of America

Funding Period: 2019-2021

 

THE CHALLENGE

City Year has a bold vision of what public schools can be for all children: a place where all students learn, explore, take risks and thrive because they feel connected to their school community and supported by adults. Due to systemic inequities that disproportionately impact students of color and students growing up in low-income households, too many students across the country do not have access to the educational supports and social-emotional resources they need to succeed and reach their full potential.

 

ABOUT THE PROJECT

City Year partners with schools and teachers to work with students who research shows are at increased risk for dropping out: students with low attendance; poor behavior; and course failure in English Language Arts or mathematics. City Year AmeriCorps members serve in schools full-time. They build positive, consistent and caring relationships with students; collaborate with partner teachers; and provide one-on-one, classroom and whole school support to help students develop academic and social-emotional skills and stay on-track to high school graduation. City Year partners with 350 public schools across 29 US cities.

 

IN THEIR OWN WORDS

This story is from a City Year AmeriCorps member, describing their work with a student who was eager to take on challenges:

“Early in the year, Desmond struggled to come to school and make it to class on time. We set attendance goals and if he reached them, Desmond wanted to challenge me in basketball. He reached his goal and we played the longest basketball game I’ve ever played. Desmond realized the importance of being at school every day and raised his average daily attendance from 84% to 90%. But, being at school didn’t mean anything if he wasn’t learning, so we continued to work. When Desmond struggled with something, we would work together one-on-one, like in basketball. By the end of the year he raised his English grade from a D to a B.’’

 

Photograph: ©City Year